Raw cane sugar: fast energy, important for regeneration

Roro cane sugar

Sugar cane general

The various types of cane sugar are obtained from the sugar cane. Originally the sweet grass comes from East Asia, today the sugar cane is found mainly in tropical and subtropical regions.

Brazil, India, South Africa and Cuba, for example, are important growing countries.

The stalks of the plant reach a height of up to 6m, and the diameter is 4.5cm.

The flowers also reach a size of up to 60cm, but are not interesting for the economy. The economy is interested in the long stalks, because they contain the sweet pulp from which cane sugar is obtained.

From the sugar cane sugar are obtained various types of sugar used, which differ depending on the processing: Whole cane sugar, raw cane sugar and cane sugar. We know the latter as household sugar, which is obtained from sugar cane.

The sugar produced in Central Europe, on the other hand, is obtained from the sugar beet and is called beet sugar. Whereas chemically there is no difference between pure cane sugar and pure beet sugar.

Raw cane sugar production

As in the production of whole cane sugar, the sugar cane is also pressed out in the production of raw cane sugar. The sugar juice is separated from the sugar cane. After this step, the sugar juice is filtered and then boiled several times.

During the cooking process, the sugar juice loses a little more water each time and thus becomes thicker.

The by-products are molasses and sugar crystals. Unlike whole cane sugar, raw cane sugar is refined once. The refining process separates the molasses and the crystals.

This also explains its color. The more often the refining process is carried out, the lighter the sugar becomes. For this reason, the raw cane sugar is lighter than the whole cane sugar, but darker than the white household sugar.

Raw cane sugar thus represents, in a sense, an intermediate stage between whole cane sugar and cane sugar. This also applies to the mineral content.

Because of the only one-time refining certain amount of minerals and trace elements remain contained.

Thus, in the case of raw cane sugar, sucrose occurs in quantities of about 98%. The rest are minerals, trace elements and flavors.

Raw cane sugar is the sugar we use for our regeneration drinks in our RECOVERY SHAKE and RECOVERY 8 use.

Fast energy for athletes

Carbohydrates (also called saccharides) exist in different chain lengths. They are called mono-, di-, tri-, oligo- or polysaccharides, depending on the chain length.

The chain length determines the respective duration of the carbohydrate breakdown and thus a faster or slower degradation. This results in a rapid or rather slower availability in the body. Disaccharides are broken down rapidly, polysaccharides as complex carbohydrates more slowly.

Cane sugar species consist mainly of sucrose. These erde broken down quickly, are high in calories and cause blood sugar levels to rise quickly.

The added sugar in our products thus enables a quick availability of carbohydrates, which is important, for example, during intense training sessions or competitions – but also afterwards!

Important for better regeneration

Quickly digestible carbohydrate sources are quickly absorbed and thus serve to replenish glycogen stores. These are largely used up after intensive stress.

If the body no longer has enough carbohydrates available, it has to fall back on muscle proteins as an energy reserve. It stands to reason that this should be avoided at all costs.

Recent studies also show that rapid energy intake is also important in terms of adaptation to the training stimulus – including the production of mitochondria.

In addition, rapid replenishment of glycogen stores reduces the risk of infection. Weakened, our organism is particularly susceptible to pathogens. Therefore, a rapid supply of energy after exertion is of high importance for every athlete.

Our sports nutrition products with raw cane sugar:

Other interesting active ingredients

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